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  2. Katie L. Burkhouse

Katie L. Burkhouse PhD

Katie L. Burkhouse
Designation
  • Assistant Professor of Psychiatry
  • Department of Psychiatry
  • University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine
Contact Information
  • kburkho [at] uic.edu
  • (312) 413-4470
  • Institute for Juvenile Research (IJR)
    1747 W. Roosevelt Rd.
    Chicago IL 60612
  • Room #:249

Dr. Burkhouse is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and a Clinical Psychologist affiliated with UIC’s Pediatric Mood Disorders Clinic. She received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Binghamton University (SUNY) and completed her Clinical Internship at UIC. Her program of research broadly focuses on identifying behavioral-brain risk phenotypes and preventive interventions for youth depressive disorders. Much of this work focuses on utilizing multiple levels of analysis (i.e., behavioral, EEG, pupil dilation, fMRI) to identify cognitive-affective processing styles involved in the transmission of depression from parents to their offspring. A second focus of her research involves applying this mechanism-based work to prevention efforts for youth at high risk for depression. The ultimate goal of this work is to improve the identification and prevention of internalizing disorders in children and adolescents.

  • psychiatry

    Brain-behavioral risk markers for youth depression; intergenerational transmission of depression; predictors of prevention and intervention response for youth depression

  • Brain-Behavior Markers of Emotion in Depressed Mothers and Their Daughters

    Patient-Oriented Career Development Award
    2017-2022 National Institute of Mental Health K23-MH113793 – PI: Burkhouse

     


  • Targeting Biomarkers of Risk among Offspring of Depressed Parents through a Cognitive Behavioral Preventive Intervention

    2017-2019 Klingenstein Third Generation Foundation Fellowship Program – PI: Burkhouse


  • Brain-Behavior Predictors and Targets of Depression Improvement among High Risk Youth Following a Preventive Intervention

    2019-2021 NARSAD Young Investigator Grant – PI: Burkhouse


  • Kujawa, A., Burkhouse, K. L., Karich, S., Fitzgerald, K., Monk, C. S., & Phan, K. L. (in press). Reduced reward responsiveness predicts change in depressive symptoms in anxious children and adolescents following treatment. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

    Burkhouse, K. L., Owens, M., James, K., & Gibb, B. E. (in press). Age differences in electrocortical reactivity to fearful faces following aversive conditioning. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology.

    Cohen, J.R., Thakur, H., Burkhouse, K.L., & Gibb, B.E. (in press). A multi-method screening approach for pediatric depression onset: An Incremental Validity Study. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

    Peters, A. T., Burkhouse, K. L., Kujawa, A., Afshar, K., Monk, C. S., Fitzgerald, K., Hajcak, G., & Phan, K. L. (in press). Impact of pubertal timing and depression on error-related brain activity in anxious youth. Developmental Psychobiology.

    Burkhouse, K. L., Gorka, S. M., Klumpp, H., Kennedy, A. E., Francis, J., Ajilore, O., Craske, M. G., Langenecker, S., Shankman, S. A., Hajcak, G., & Phan, K. L. (in press). Neural responsiveness to reward as an index of depressive symptom change following cognitive-behavioral therapy and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

    Feurer, C., Burkhouse, K. L., Siegle, G. J., & Gibb, B. E. (in press). Increased pupil dilation to angry faces predicts interpersonal stress generation in offspring of depressed mothers. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. 

    Burkhouse, K. L., Owens, M., Feurer, C., Sosoo, E., Kudinova, A., & Gibb, B. E. (2017). Increased neural and pupillary reactivity to emotional faces in adolescents with current and remitted major depressive disorder. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 12(5), 783-792.

    Burkhouse, K. L., Jacobs, R. H., Peters, A. T., Ajilore, O., Watkins, E. R., & Langenecker, S. A. (2017). Neural correlates of rumination in adolescents with remitted major depressive disorder and healthy controls. Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Neuroscience, 17(2), 394-405.

    Burkhouse, K. L., Kujawa, A., Klumpp, H., Fitzgerald, K., Monk, C., & Phan, K. L. (2017). Neural correlates of explicit and implicit emotion processing in relation to pediatric anxiety treatment response. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 58(5), 546-554.

    Burkhouse, K. L., Kujawa, A., Keenan, K., Klumpp, H., Fitzgerald, K., Monk, C., & Phan, K. L. (2017). The relation between parent depressive symptoms and neural correlates of attentional control in offspring: A preliminary study. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, 263, 26-31.

    Kujawa, A., & Burkhouse, K. L. (2017). Vulnerability to depression in youth: Advances from affective neuroscience. Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, 2, 28-37.

    Burkhouse, K.L., Woody, M.L., Owens, M., McGeary, J. E., Knopik, V., & Gibb, B. E. (2016). Sensitivity in detecting facial displays of emotion: Impact of maternal depression and oxytocin receptor genotype. Cognition and Emotion, 30, 302-313.

    Burkhouse, K. L., Siegle, G. J., Woody, M. L., Kudinova, A. Y., & Gibb, B. E. (2015). Pupillary reactivity to sad stimuli as a biomarker of depression risk: Evidence from a prospective study of children. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 124, 498-506.

    Burkhouse, K. L., Siegle, G. J., & Gibb, B. E. (2014). Pupillary reactivity to emotional stimuli in children of depressed and anxious mothers. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 55, 1009-1016.

Title Description Investigator(s) Category Status
Brain-Behavior Markers of Emotion in Depressed Mothers and Their Daughters Daughters of mothers with a history of depression are at extremely high risk for developing depression themselves and thus, there is a need to identify specific mechanisms of risk in order to develop targeted, prevention efforts. Families, Affective Neuroscience, and Mood Disorders (FAM) Lab On-going
Targeting Biomarkers of Risk among Offspring of Depressed Parents through a Cognitive Behavioral Preventive Intervention The PODS study leverages a well-developed evidence-based family group cognitive-behavioral prevention program (developed by Bruce Compas – Vanderbilt University) to examine whether biological markers (ERPs) implicated in emotion processing can be altered in children of depressed parents to reduce depression risk. Families, Affective Neuroscience, and Mood Disorders (FAM) Lab On-going