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  2. Jonathan P. Stange

Jonathan P. Stange PhD

Jonathan P. Stange
Designation
  • Assistant Professor
  • Director, Cognition and Affect Regulation (CAR) Lab
  • Department of Psychiatry
  • University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine
Contact Information
  • jstange@uic.edu
  • (312) 355-1106
  • School of Public Health / Psychiatric Institute (SPHPI)
    1601 W. Taylor St.
    SPHPI MC 912
    Chicago IL 60612
  • Room #:455

Dr. Stange’s research focuses on identifying mechanisms and outcomes of inflexible cognitive and affective processes in mood disorders. His current work seeks to identify how disrupted interactions between cognitive and affective processes may underlie maladaptive affect regulation in individuals at risk for problems such as depression and suicide.  This work involves the use of neuroimaging, autonomic psychophysiology, and experimental, behavioral, and longitudinal methods. Increasingly, this work involves studying affect regulation outside of the lab in “real-world” contexts that may have greater ecological validity than traditional laboratory-based methods, by using ambulatory assessment techniques (e.g., ambulatory autonomic psychophysiology, sleep actigraphy, and behavior with ecological momentary assessment). By improving our understanding of how risk factors may vary between individuals, and within individuals across contexts over time, these studies will have implications for the development of real-time, person-centered metrics for detecting periods of risk, and for intervening to improve affect regulation and reduce risk.

This work has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health as a K23 Career Development Award and an F31 National Research Service Award, and by grants from the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (NARSAD Young Investigator Award), the Portes Foundation and Institute of Medicine of Chicago, the Association for Psychological Science, the American Psychological Foundation, and the American Psychological Association.

Dr. Stange received a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Temple University. He completed his clinical internship and NIMH T32 postdoctoral fellowship in neuroimaging at UIC.

  • psychiatry
    • Neural mechanisms of the cognitive control of negative affect
    • Person-centered (repeated-measure, within-subject) metrics of cognitive-affective risk processes
    • Ambulatory assessment of affect regulation in real-world contexts (e.g., wearables for measuring within-subject variability in psychophysiology, behavior, and affect)
    • Interactions between cognitive and affective systems across the development of mood disorders
    • Longitudinal multi-level assessment of cognitive and affective processes in mood disorders
    • Cognitive vulnerability-stress models of mood disorders
  • From Networks to the Real World: Integrating Neural and Autonomic Processes of Loss (NIMH K23)

  • Probing Autonomic and Network Mechanisms of Emotion Regulation in Major Depressive Disorder (NARSAD Young Investigator Award)

  • Identifying Mechanisms of Proximal Suicide Risk Using Ambulatory Assessment (Portes Foundation and Institute of Medicine of Chicago)

  • Stange, J. P., Jenkins, L. M., Pocius, S., Kreutzer, K., Bessette, K., DelDonno, S. R., Kling, L. R., Bhaumik, R., Welsh, R. C., Keilp, J. G., Phan, K. L., & Langenecker, S. A. (in press). Using resting-state intrinsic network connectivity to identify suicide risk in mood disorders. Psychological Medicine.

    Stange, J. P., Kleiman, E. M., Mermelstein, R. J., & Trull, T. J. (in press). Using ambulatory assessment to measure dynamic risk processes in affective disorders. Journal of Affective Disorders.

    Stange, J. P., MacNamara, A., Kennedy, A. E., Hajcak, G., Phan, K. L., & Klumpp, H. (in press). Brain-behavioral adaptability predicts response to cognitive behavioral therapy for emotional disorders: A person-centered event-related potential study. Neuropsychologia.

    Langenecker, S. A., Klumpp, H., Peters, A. T., Crane, N .A., DelDonno, S. R., Bessette, K. L., Ajilore, O., Leow, A., Shankman, S., Phan, K. L., Zubieta, J-K., Mickey, B. J., & Stange, J. P. (2019). Multidimensional imaging techniques for prediction of treatment response in mood disorders. Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 21, 38-48.

    Burkhouse, K. L., Stange, J. P., Jacobs, R. H., Bhaumic, R., Bessette, K. L., Peters, A. T., Crane, N. A., Kreutzer, K. A., Fitzgerald, K., Monk, C., Welsh, R. C., Phan, K. L., & Langenecker, S. A. (2019). Developmental changes in resting-state functional networks in individuals with and without internalizing psychopathologies. Depression and Anxiety, 36(2), 141-152.

    Peters, A. T., Jenkins, L. M., Stange, J. P., Bessette, K. L., Skerrett, K. A., Kling, L. R., Welsh, R., Milad, M., Phan, K. L., & Langenecker, S. A. (2019). Pre-scan cortisol is differentially associated with enhanced cross-network connectivity to the cognitive control network in young adults with a history of depression. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 104, 219-227.

    Stange, J. P., Zulueta, J., Langenecker, S. A., Ryan, K. A., Piscitello, A., Duffecy, J., McInnis, M. G., Nelson, P., Ajilore, O., & Leow, A. (2018). Let your fingers do the talking: Passive typing instability predicts future mood outcomes. Bipolar Disorders, 20(3), 285-288.

    Stange, J. P., Jenkins, L. M., Hamlat, E. J., Bessette, K. L., DelDonno, S., Kling, L. R., Passarotti, A. M., Phan, K. L., Klumpp, H., Ryan, K. A., & Langenecker, S. A. (2018). Disrupted engagement of networks supporting hot and cold cognition in remitted major depressive disorder. Journal of Affective Disorders, 227, 183-191.

    Stange, J. P., Jenkins, L. M., Bessette, K. L., Kling, L. R., Bark, J. S., Shepard, R., Hamlat, E. J., DelDonno, S., Phan, K. L., Passarotti, A. M., Ajilore, O., & Langenecker, S. A. (2018). Predictors of attrition in longitudinal neuroimaging research: Inhibitory control, head movement, and resting-state functional connectivity. Brain Connectivity, 8(9), 527-536.

    Quinn, M. E., Stange, J. P., Jenkins, L. M., Corwin, S., DelDonno, S. R., Bessette, K. L., Welsh, R. C., & Langenecker, S. A. (2018). Cognitive control impairment and resting state networks disruption in remitted major depressive disorder: An early developmental correlate of childhood adversity. Social Cognitive Affective Neuroscience, 13(10),1081-1090.

    Stange, J. P., Bessette, K. L., Jenkins, L., Peters, A. T., Feldhaus, C., Crane, N. A., Ajilore, O., Jacobs, R. H, Watkins, E. R., & Langenecker, S. A. (2017). Attenuated intrinsic connectivity within cognitive control network among individuals with remitted depression: Temporal stability and association with negative cognitive styles. Human Brain Mapping, 38(6), 2939-2954.

    Stange, J. P., MacNamara, A., Barnas, O., Kennedy, A. E., Hajcak, G., Phan, K. L., & Klumpp, H. (2017). Neural markers of attention to aversive pictures predict response to cognitive behavioral therapy in anxiety and depression. Biological Psychology, 123, 269-277.

    Jenkins, L., Stange, J. P., Barba, A., DelDonno, S., Kling, L., Briceno, E., Weisenbach, S., Phan, K. L., Shankman, S., Welsh, R. C., & Langenecker, S. A. (2017). Integrated cross-network connectivity of amygdala, insula and subgenual cingulate associated with facial emotion perception in healthy controls and remitted major depressive disorder. Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Neuroscience, 17(6), 1242-1254.

    Stange, J. P., Hamilton, J. L., Olino, T. M., Fresco, D. M., & Alloy, L. B. (2017). Autonomic reactivity and vulnerability to depression: A multi-wave study. Emotion, 17(4), 602-615.

    Stange, J. P., Hamilton, J. L., Fresco, D. M., & Alloy, L. B. (2017). Flexible parasympathetic responses to sadness facilitate spontaneous affect regulation. Psychophysiology, 54(7), 1054-1069.

    Stange, J. P., Hamilton, J. L., Fresco, D. M., & Alloy, L. B. (2017). Perseverate or decenter? Differential effects of metacognition on the relationship between parasympathetic inflexibility and symptoms of depression in a multi-wave study. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 97, 123-133.

    Stange, J. P., Alloy, L. B., & Fresco, D. M. (2017). Inflexibility and vulnerability to depression: A systematic qualitative review. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 24(3), 245-276.

    Stange, J. P., Connolly, S. L., Burke, T. A., Hamilton, J. L., Hamlat, E. J., Abramson, L. Y., & Alloy, L. B. (2016). Inflexible cognition predicts first onset of major depression in adolescence. Depression and Anxiety33(11), 1005-1012.

    Stange, J. P., Sylvia, L. G., Magalhães, P. V., Miklowitz, D. J., Otto, M. W., Frank, E., Yim, C., Berk, M., Dougherty, D. D., Nierenberg, A. A., & Deckersbach, T. (2016). Affective instability and the course of bipolar depression: Results from the STEP-BD randomized, controlled trial of psychosocial treatment.  British Journal of Psychiatry, 208(4), 352-358.

    Stange, J. P., Sylvia, L. G., Magalhães, P. V., Miklowitz, D. J., Otto, M. W., Frank, E., Berk, M., Hansen, N. S., Dougherty, D. D., Nierenberg, A. A., & Deckersbach, T. (2014). Extreme attributions predict suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in bipolar disorder: Prospective data from STEP-BD. World Psychiatry, 13(1), 95-96.

    Stange, J. P., Sylvia, L. G., Magalhães, P. V., Miklowitz, D. J., Otto, M. W., Frank, E., Berk, M., Nierenberg, A. A., & Deckersbach, T. (2013). Extreme attributions predict the course of bipolar depression: Results from the STEP-BD randomized controlled trial of psychosocial treatment.  Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 74(3), 249-255.

Title Description Investigator(s) Category Status
From Networks to the Real World: Integrating Neural and Autonomic Processes of Loss 1K23MH112769-01A1 – National Institute of Mental Health Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the most common lifetime mental disorder and is associated with tremendous personal, economic and societal costs; thus, there is a need to better understand the processes underlying MDD to facilitate the development of mechanistically-driven interventions. The proposed research will link neural circuitry underlying cognitive control and affective processing to autonomic and behavioral measures of affect regulation in the laboratory and in daily life, among individuals with remitted MDD and healthy controls. An improved mechanistic understanding of cognitive-affective risk phenotypes for depression will inform the timely prevention, early detection, and advancement of novel treatments for affect dysregulation in depression. Cognition and Affect Regulation (CAR) Lab On-going
Identifying Mechanisms of Proximal Suicide Risk Using Ambulatory Assessment Portes Foundation and Institute of Medicine of Chicago Suicide is the second leading cause of death among young adults in the United States and often occurs within the context of major depressive disorder.  Difficulties with regulating strong negative emotions is a candidate mechanism by which numerous risk factors may lead to suicidal behavior.  However, existing models of suicide risk have had only modest success, suggesting the need to go beyond traditional laboratory-based methods by measuring emotional processes in real-world contexts that are closer in time to the occurrence of suicidal ideation, and that have greater ecological validity.  The present study will use ambulatory assessment, involving wearable technology to measure physiological and behavioral components of emotion regulation in participants’ daily lives, among N=40 individuals with major depressive disorder who have experienced suicidal ideation within the past month (n=20 of whom have a past suicide attempt).  Participants will complete seven days of ambulatory assessment during which putative biological mechanisms of emotion regulation (sleep quality and parasympathetic activity), behavioral factors (emotions, regulation strategies), and environmental factors (activity, stressors, substance use) are assessed across the day.  By using an innovative, person-centered approach, this study will detect contexts when individuals are at particular risk for suicidal ideation, and will evaluate which individuals with ideation may be at risk for suicide attempts. These data have important implications for the development of personalized suicide prevention interventions to identify possible periods of suicide risk in real time, and intervene to improve affect regulation and related factors in ways that affect daily functioning, thereby reducing risk. Cognition and Affect Regulation (CAR) Lab On-going
Probing Autonomic and Network Mechanisms of Emotion Regulation in Major Depressive Disorder Brain and Behavior Research Foundation (NARSAD Young Investigator Award) Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent and debilitating disorder that places a heavy burden on society through healthcare service use, loss of productivity, and loss of life to suicide.  To develop more effective treatments and reduce risk for recurrence, there is an urgent need for a more precise mechanistic understanding of depression risk phenotypes. Despite having a greater need for effective emotion regulation, individuals with MDD experience less benefit from attempts to regulate than individuals without MDD, leading to prolonged negative emotion and suppressed parasympathetic nervous system activity. By identifying biomarkers of problematic responses to sadness, treatments can be developed that allow for regulatory intervention earlier than when relying exclusively on individuals’ self-reports of these processes. The proposed study aims to identify (a) brain networks important in disrupted emotion regulation that can be targeted to improve regulatory success, and (b) parasympathetic indicators of disrupted network functioning that are less invasive and more cost-effective to evaluate than fMRI. This study has important implications for the identification of neural and psychophysiological mechanisms of emotion regulation that have strong potential for translation to novel interventions. Parasympathetic activity (respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA], a plausible parasympathetic biomarker of depression risk) and regulatory effectiveness will be assessed during a laboratory-based sadness paradigm. This design will bridge key gaps in the field and build upon the candidate’s existing strengths in the experimental and longitudinal assessment of cognitive-affective vulnerabilities for depression in two new areas: neural network modeling and multimodal data integration. We hypothesize that maladaptive patterns of activation in neural networks supporting emotion processing (elevated) and cognitive control (diminished) will be associated with poorer regulation, indexed by poorer parasympathetic and emotional recovery from sadness. Given that RSA is a brief, inexpensive, and noninvasive measure that can be collected in any lab, we expect results to suggest that RSA can provide a remote window into brain networks underlying emotion regulation. This study has the potential to contribute to new tools (e.g., neuromodulation, biofeedback, behavioral techniques) to improve the detection and treatment of emotion dysregulation in depression. Cognition and Affect Regulation (CAR) Lab On-going