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David P. Gavin MD , MS

David P. Gavin
Designation
  • Associate Professor
  • Director of the Psychiatry Residency Neuroscience Research Tracks
Contact Information
  • dgavin1@uic.edu
  • (312) 413-3970
  • Molecular Biology Research Building (MBRB)
    900 S. Ashland
    (entrance to building is on Marshfield side of street)
    Chicago IL 60607

Dr. Gavin is interested in the effects of drugs of abuse on neurobiology and their relationships to mental illness. He received a BA from the University of Chicago in Biology with a specialization in Molecular Genetics and Cellular Biology. He attended the University of Illinois at Chicago medical school. He performed his psychiatry residency at UIC on the Adult Psychiatry Neuroscience Research Track while pursuing an MS degree in Neuroscience. Dr. Gavin remained at UIC following residency and currently is an Associate Professor at UIC and an attending psychiatrist both at UIC and the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center.

His research involves studying epigenetic mechanisms using both clinical models, such as patient peripheral blood cells, and basic models, such as cultured mouse neurons. One aim of this research is to translate findings of gene regulatory abnormalities in schizophrenia into clinically useful tools to predict treatment response and develop novel therapeutics.This research has been presented at several international conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals.

  • psychiatry

    Elucidating factors that control gene expression as they relate to cognition and perception. The ultimate goal of these projects is the rapid application of basic scientific findings to diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment use in patients.

Title Description Investigator(s) Category Status
Neuronal PARP activity in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) are the leading identifiable and preventable cause of intellectual disability. This project examines how a key enzyme in gene regulation, Poly ADP Ribose Polymerase (PARP), known to be altered by ethanol exposure, produces the profound and lifelong neuropsychiatric manifestations of FASD. The Gavin Lab On-going
PARP-mediated gene regulation in alcohol drinking behavior Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a highly prevalent disorder. The molecular mechanisms that underlie alcohol-seeking behavior have yet to be discovered. This project examines how PARP perturbs gene expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The Gavin Lab On-going