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  2. Angela L. Walden

Angela L. Walden PhD

Angela L. Walden
Designation
  • Clinical Assistant Professor, Institute for Juvenile Research, Department of Psychiatry
  • Research Assistant Professor, Center for Dissemination and Implementation Science, Department of Medicine
Contact Information
  • walden1 [at] uic.edu
  • (312) 996-9507
  • College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry
    University of Illinois at Chicago

  • Institute for Juvenile Research (IJR)
    1747 W. Roosevelt Rd.
    Chicago IL 60612
  • Room #:230
  • -----------------------------------------------
  • Student Residence Hall (SRH)
    818 S. Wolcott Ave.
    Chicago IL 60612
  • Room #:730

Dr. Angela Walden is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Research Assistant Professor in the Center for Dissemination and Implementation Science in the Department of Medicine. She is also a Faculty Affiliate of the Community Engagement & Collaboration Core in UIC’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science. Dr. Walden received her Bachelor of Science Degree in Psychology from California Polytechnic State University and Master of Arts and Doctoral Degrees in Clinical-Community Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She completed her clinical internship and postdoctoral training at the Institute for Juvenile Research in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Dr. Walden provides clinical services through the Pediatric Mood Disorders Clinic. Her training as a clinical-scientist and background in both clinical and community psychology informs her clinical approach; she utilizes empirically-supported models while also recognizing that clients’ cognitions and behaviors are influenced by individual-, family-, and social-level factors. Her theoretical orientation incorporates a multilevel understanding of mental health and intervention, rooted in cognitive-behavioral approaches.

Dr. Walden’s research focuses on community-based prevention and intervention with high-risk, marginalized populations (e.g., American Indians/Native Americans living in urban areas; juvenile justice involved youth). Her specific interests include quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research designs to examine the development, implementation, and evaluation of community-based interventions; implementation and transportation of innovative and effective treatments and practices in novel community settings; the infusion of intervention practices into existing non-mental health settings and through the actions of non-mental health workforces (e.g., juvenile corrections staff); community-based collaboration and system-level change; and factors that contribute to mental health disparities among members of high-needs, underserved populations.

Dr. Walden recently completed a qualitative study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health examining community readiness for a culturally relevant STIs/HIV and intimate partner violence intervention with urban American Indians in Chicago. In addition, she provided a commentary on health disparities affecting urban American Indians for a report created by UIC’s Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy; this report can be found at: https://irrpp.uic.edu.

Dr. Walden is also the recipient of a Diversity Supplement from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities that builds on an existing research study - “Peer Versus Adult-Led HIV Prevention for Juvenile Offenders: Effectiveness and Costs” (R01MD010433; PI: G. Donenberg). Dr. Walden’s Diversity Supplement study examines the determinants of implementation of an evidence-based intervention (PHAT Life) that targets youth involved in the juvenile legal system, focuses on HIV and mental health, and is delivered by juvenile probation setting staff.

  • psychiatry

    Child and Adolescent Psychology; Pediatric Mood Disorders; Community-Based Research; Dissemination and Implementation Science 

  • Diversity Supplement, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

    2015 – 2018
    National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, U54 CTSA award
    (PIs: R. Mermelstein & L. Tobachman, University of Illinois at Chicago)
    50% FTE salary support 
    Role: Coordinator, Community-Based Dissemination and Implementation Science


  • Lauhoe: Indigenous HIV/AIDS Research Training Program 2 (IHART2)

    2016 – 2019
    National Institute of Mental Health, Grant #2R25MH084565 
    (PI: K. Walters, University of Washington)
    $20,000 research subcontract award plus conference travel support
    Role: IHART2 Fellow


  • UIC Center for Clinical and Translational Science

    2015 – 2018
    National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, U54 CTSA award
    (PIs: R. Mermelstein & L. Tobachman, University of Illinois at Chicago)
    50% FTE salary support 
    Role: Coordinator, Community-Based Dissemination and Implementation Science


  • Partners Achieving School Success

    2015 – 2017
    Anonymous Local Foundation, (PI: M. Atkins, University of Illinois at Chicago)
    Role: Co-Investigator 


  • Building Family Foundations

    2015 – 2017
    Anonymous Local Foundation, (PI: M. Atkins, University of Illinois at Chicago)
    Role: Co-Investigator


  • Native Children’s Research Exchange

    2014 – 2015
    National Institute on Drug Abuse, Contract #HHSN271201200692P 
    (PIs: N. Whitesell & M. Sarche, University of Colorado Denver)
    $2,000 research award plus conference travel support
    Role: NCRE Scholar
     


  • Coordinating the Criminal Justice Response to Intimate Partner Violence: The Effectiveness of Councils in Producing Systems Change

    2008 – 2009
    National Institute of Justice, Grant #2005-WG-BX-0005
    (PI: Nicole E. Allen, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
    Graduate Hourly Research Appointment
    Role: Graduate Research Assistant


  • Walden, A.L., & Allen, N.E. (accepted for publication). Examining correctional staff members’ engagement in rehabilitative practices in short-term juvenile detention. American Journal of Community Psychology.

    Walden, A.L., & West, A.E. (in press). American Indian researcher perspectives on qualitative inquiry about and within American Indian communities. American Journal of Community Psychology.

    Walden, A.L., Joseph, N., & Verona, E. (2019). Reaching underserved youth: A pilot implementation of a skills-based intervention in short-term juvenile detention. Journal of Prevention and Intervention in the Community, 47(2), 90-103, doi: 10.1080/10852352.2019.1582147

    Mehta, T., Lakind, D., Rusch, D., Walden, A.L., & Atkins, M.S. (2019). Collaboration with urban community stakeholders: Refining paraprofessional-led services to promote positive parenting. American Journal of Community Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajcp.12316

    Rusch, D., Walden, A.L., Gustafson, E., Lakind, D., & Atkins, M.S. (2019). A qualitative study to explore paraprofessionals’ role in a children’s mental health prevention and early intervention services. Journal of Community Psychology, 47(2), 272-290, doi: 10.1002/jcop.22120

    Mehta, T., Atkins, M., Neal, J.W., & Walden, A.L. (2018). Supporting mental health providers: The feasibility and promise of a virtual professional learning community. Evidence-Based Practice in Child & Adolescent Mental Health, 3(4), 236-251. https://doi.org/10.1080/23794925.2018.1486687

    Jacobs, R.H., Guo, S., Kaundinya, P., Lakind, D., Klein, J., Rusch, D., Walden, A., Mehta, T., & Atkins, M. (2017). A pilot study of mindfulness skills to reduce stress among a diverse paraprofessional workforce. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 26(9), 2579-2588. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-017-0771-z

    Allen, N.E., Walden, A.L., Dworkin, E.R., & Javdani, S. (2016). Mixed methodology as a key asset in multi-level, multi-setting inquiry. In L. Jason & D. Glenwick (Eds.), Handbook of Methodological Approaches to Community-Based Research:  Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods. New York, NY: Oxford University Press

    Walden, A.L., Javdani, S., & Allen, N.E. (2014). Engaging conflict: Supporting power-sharing through constructive conflict resolution. Journal of Community Psychology, 42(7), 854-868. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcop.21657

    Allen, N.E., Javdani, S., Lehrner, A., & Walden, A.L. (2012). “Changing the Text”: Modeling council capacity to produce institutionalized change. American Journal of Community Psychology, 49, 317-331. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10464-011-9460-z

    Allen, N.E., Larsen S.E., & Walden, A.L. (2010). Community-based services for battered women and their children. In C. Renzetti & J. Edleson (Eds.), Sourcebook on Violence Against Women. (245-263). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications

Title Description Investigator(s) Category Status
Building Family Foundations (BFF) BFF was a prenatal to early childhood home-visiting program to support first-time Latino and African American young mothers in their transition to motherhood and adulthood. Community Based Children and Family Mental Health Services Research Program On-going
Building multi-level support for recreational staff members to infuse mental health promotion into everyday practices This project is a collaboration with Urban Initiatives, a citywide non-profit foundation that utilizes soccer and active play to promote youth physical and mental health in resource-scarce neighborhoods.  The project employs an iterative collaborative approach to enhance the organizational capacity of UI to impact youth physical and mental health by strengthening their workforce development pra Community Based Children and Family Mental Health Services Research Program On-going
Community readiness for a culturally relevant sexually transmitted infection (STI/HIV) and intimate partner violence (IPV) intervention with urban American Indians There is growing recognition of the need to understand the health and development of American Indians (AIs) living in urban communities. The relationship between sexually transmitted infections (STI), including HIV, and intimate partner violence (IPV) is well-documented in non-AI populations, but relatively few studies have focused on urban AI populations specifically. Community Based Children and Family Mental Health Services Research Program On-going
Leaders @ Play Our team has been collaborating with the Chicago Park District for the past decade to develop and implement strategies that capitalize on the inherent opportunities present in recreation to support and promote children’s mental health. Leaders @ Play was a program designed to promote mental health for participating adolescents and support healthy behavioral, social, and emotional funct Community Based Children and Family Mental Health Services Research Program Completed
Partners Achieving School Success (PASS) PASS was a school based mental health prevention and early intervention program for children in pre-kindergarten through third grade.  Our team collaborated with four social service agencies on a school-based prevention and early intervention program for youth in K-3rd grade living in impoverished communities in Chicago (approximately n=700). Community Based Children and Family Mental Health Services Research Program Completed