www.psych.uic.edu

Additional Resources

http://www.nami.org/the
National Alliance for the Mentally Ill national web site

http://www.namigc.org/NAMI
The National Alliance on Mental Illness of Greater Chicago

http://www.webmd.com/schizophrenia/default.htmmedical
Information about schizophrenia from a very reliable websource.

http://www.schizophrenia.com/
The oldest – and probably best – schizophrenia site that is managed by a family member.

http://www.thresholds.org/thresholds
A world renowned rehabilitation program with many faculties and programs in the greater Chicago area.

http://www.orygen.org.au/shoppingCategory.asp?categoryId=21
The most established programs for “first-episode” psychosis comes from Australia. They have wonderful material for persons with psychosis, families, and clinicians.

http://theicarusproject.net/
A web site for young people who have had mental health issues that emphasizes peer support and networking. “The Icarus Project envisions a new culture and language that resonates with our actual experiences of 'mental illness' rather than trying to fit our lives into a conventional framework.”

http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=29728
This is the Illinois department of mental health website that can get you started on services and policies for persons with serious mental illness living in Illinois.

http://motherbearcan.com/
Mother Bear, Families for Mental Health is a family-led recovery network whose mission is to be a catalyst the mental health recovery movement. We believe that recovery from even the most severe emotional states is not only possible, but should be expected.

http://www.lernetwork.org/
The Lived Experience Research Network (LERN) aims to advance inclusion and social justice issues impacting service users/survivors. LERN also hopes to narrow the gap between advocacy and research. The mission of LERN is to promote leadership and inclusion of service user/survivor in behavioral health and disabilities research and practice; support service user/survivor-identified students, researchers and evaluators; advocate for increased accessibility in research and evaluation settings, social justice, and policy. LERN welcomes LERNterns, undergraduate and graduate students with lived experience of psychiatric disabilities and/or the mental health system. LERNtern will work on activist research projects thus gaining substantive research and grant writing experience; skills that will help in preparation for graduate school; and targeted support and accommodations. At LERN, LERNterns will find a community that promotes and encourages the actualization of life goals and ambitions.

http://www.intervoiceonline.org/
This is the most extensive international resource on hearing voices you can find on the web. This information includes both ways of overcoming the difficulties faced by people who hear voices, as well as the more positive aspects of the experience and its cultural and historical significance.

http://www.hearingvoicesusa.org/
Is a nationally-based networks around the world joined by shared goals and values, incorporating a fundamental belief that there are many ways to understand the experience of hearing voices and other unusual or extreme experiences. It is part of an international collaboration between professionals, people with lived experience, and their families to develop an alternative approach to coping with emotional distress that is empowering and useful to people, and does not start from the assumption that they have a chronic illness.

http://www.mentalhealthrecovery.com/wrap/
The Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) was developed by a group of people who experience mental health challenges. These people learned that they can identify what makes them well, and then use their own Wellness Tools to relieve difficult feelings and maintain wellness. The result has been recovery and long-term stability. Your WRAP® program is designed by you in practical, day-to-day terms, and holds the key to getting and staying well. It does not necessarily replace traditional treatments, but can be used as a compliment to any other treatment options you have chosen.

http://www.illinoismentalhealthcollaborative.com/consumers/consumer_crss.htm
The Certified Recovery Support Specialist (CRSS) is a credential for persons with lived experience of mental health challenges, who wish to provide support to others in their recovery journey. A person with the CRSS credential uses unique insights gained through personal recovery experience. The CRSS credential assures competence in advocacy, professional responsibility, mentoring, and recovery support. Persons with the CRSS credential are employed specifically to use their personal recovery experiences to facilitate and support the recoveries of others and to help shape the mental health system to be more person-centered and empowering.

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