www.psych.uic.edu

The Consultative Specialty Service

Many patients, family members or treating clinicians request Consultative or second opinions from Attending Physicians who specialize in the treatment of complex psychiatric conditions. Our Attending Physicians specialize in the treatment of Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective, Bipolar Disorder with psychosis, and other related conditions with symptoms of psychosis. The Consultative Specialty Service provides an outpatient comprehensive diagnostic evaluation and specific treatment options for patients, families, and treating clinicians.

The Consultative Specialty Service consists of a comprehensive psychiatric diagnostic evaluations including an in-depth interview of the patient and family members, pharmacological review of current and past treatments, medical and psychiatric history, diagnostic testing such as laboratory studies, brain imaging, electroencephalography, psychological testing, if indicated.  Additionally, the Consultative Specialty Service provides assessment of cognition, trauma, alcohol and substance use; social, educational and occupational history and personal strengths, weaknesses and preferences as they relate to treatment options.

Upon completion of the comprehensive diagnostic evaluation, the Consultative Specialty Service will provide a detailed written summary of diagnosis, summary of patient and family interviews, results of any laboratory studies with pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment recommendations.

Additional Resources

http://www.nami.org/the
National Alliance for the Mentally Ill national web site

http://www.namigc.org/NAMI
The National Alliance on Mental Illness of Greater Chicago

http://www.webmd.com/schizophrenia/default.htmmedical
Information about schizophrenia from a very reliable websource.

http://www.schizophrenia.com/
The oldest – and probably best – schizophrenia site that is managed by a family member.

http://www.thresholds.org/thresholds
A world renowned rehabilitation program with many faculties and programs in the greater Chicago area.

http://www.orygen.org.au/shoppingCategory.asp?categoryId=21
The most established programs for “first-episode” psychosis comes from Australia. They have wonderful material for persons with psychosis, families, and clinicians.

http://theicarusproject.net/
A web site for young people who have had mental health issues that emphasizes peer support and networking. “The Icarus Project envisions a new culture and language that resonates with our actual experiences of 'mental illness' rather than trying to fit our lives into a conventional framework.”

http://www.dhs.state.il.us/page.aspx?item=29728
This is the Illinois department of mental health website that can get you started on services and policies for persons with serious mental illness living in Illinois.

http://motherbearcan.com/
Mother Bear, Families for Mental Health is a family-led recovery network whose mission is to be a catalyst the mental health recovery movement. We believe that recovery from even the most severe emotional states is not only possible, but should be expected.

http://www.lernetwork.org/
The Lived Experience Research Network (LERN) aims to advance inclusion and social justice issues impacting service users/survivors. LERN also hopes to narrow the gap between advocacy and research. The mission of LERN is to promote leadership and inclusion of service user/survivor in behavioral health and disabilities research and practice; support service user/survivor-identified students, researchers and evaluators; advocate for increased accessibility in research and evaluation settings, social justice, and policy. LERN welcomes LERNterns, undergraduate and graduate students with lived experience of psychiatric disabilities and/or the mental health system. LERNtern will work on activist research projects thus gaining substantive research and grant writing experience; skills that will help in preparation for graduate school; and targeted support and accommodations. At LERN, LERNterns will find a community that promotes and encourages the actualization of life goals and ambitions.

http://www.intervoiceonline.org/
This is the most extensive international resource on hearing voices you can find on the web. This information includes both ways of overcoming the difficulties faced by people who hear voices, as well as the more positive aspects of the experience and its cultural and historical significance.

http://www.hearingvoicesusa.org/
Is a nationally-based networks around the world joined by shared goals and values, incorporating a fundamental belief that there are many ways to understand the experience of hearing voices and other unusual or extreme experiences. It is part of an international collaboration between professionals, people with lived experience, and their families to develop an alternative approach to coping with emotional distress that is empowering and useful to people, and does not start from the assumption that they have a chronic illness.

http://www.mentalhealthrecovery.com/wrap/
The Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) was developed by a group of people who experience mental health challenges. These people learned that they can identify what makes them well, and then use their own Wellness Tools to relieve difficult feelings and maintain wellness. The result has been recovery and long-term stability. Your WRAP® program is designed by you in practical, day-to-day terms, and holds the key to getting and staying well. It does not necessarily replace traditional treatments, but can be used as a compliment to any other treatment options you have chosen.

http://www.illinoismentalhealthcollaborative.com/consumers/consumer_crss.htm
The Certified Recovery Support Specialist (CRSS) is a credential for persons with lived experience of mental health challenges, who wish to provide support to others in their recovery journey. A person with the CRSS credential uses unique insights gained through personal recovery experience. The CRSS credential assures competence in advocacy, professional responsibility, mentoring, and recovery support. Persons with the CRSS credential are employed specifically to use their personal recovery experiences to facilitate and support the recoveries of others and to help shape the mental health system to be more person-centered and empowering.

Research on Understanding and Treating Psychotic Disorders

The Psychosis Treatment Program has contributed significantly towards the understanding and development of new treatments for the serious psychiatric disorders for the past 40 years. These include research in biochemical, molecular, neuroimaging, and treatment modalities.

Anyone who has suffered from a psychotic disorder or who has a close connection with someone who has will probably know that there are many unanswered questions about why some people seem to be vulnerable to this kind of problem, what the underlying causes in the brain might be, which parts of the brain seems most affected by psychosis and its treatment, and how to best help people suffering from psychotic illnesses.


Researchers at the UIC Department of Psychiatry are actively working on all of these questions. All of the researchers hope that their work will help patients lead better, happier, healthier and more productive lives. Many of the researchers also work directly with patients, and our clinical team works very closely with the research team.


Researchers have known for quite some time that psychosis is not anyone's fault and certainly not caused by "bad mothering" or such nonsense. Patients and families are often told of one diagnosis which then is changed to another, which is frustrating and points to some of the challenges in not having accurate biologic tests to help clinicians with making a diagnosis. We offer research programs that look at new treatments for psychosis.


For more information on active and enrolling research projects please select the link below:
Research in the Psychosis Treatment Program

Group Therapies

Symptom Management Group
The Symptom Management Group is designed for individuals suffering from persistent psychotic symptoms to help better manage symptoms, improve functioning, and develop social skills.

The group meets weekly: Wednesday, 3 pm
For more information Please contact Robert Marvin MD, 312-413-1718

Schizoaffective Disorder Group
The Schizoaffective Disorder Group is a weekly ongoing support group that helps patients to learn about their illness, and to develop coping skills. The group will engage in problem solving, and will provide a social support system with others experiencing similar symptoms.

The group meets weekly: Wednesday, 2:45-3:45 pm
For more information please contact Patricia M. Smith RNMS, 312-996-7707

Community Reintegration Program (CRP) services
Community Reintegration Program (CRP) is a time limited psychiatric rehabilitation program dedicated to providing the supports and services necessary for mental health consumers to achieve their optimal level of social and occupational functioning. CRP provides therapeutic, social, and recreational opportunities that promote the achievement of mental health and recovery-oriented goals

The program meets four days per week: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 9:30am to 3pm.
For more information please contact Adriana Magana at 312-996-9986.

Crisis and Inpatient Services

Emergency services
Emergency/Crisis services are provided by the Urgent Intervention Team at UIC. This team of Psychiatrists and Social Workers can facilitate emergency psychiatric evaluation in UIC’s emergency department. The UIC Emergency Department is located inside UIC Hospital at 1740 West Taylor Street in Chicago. To contact the Urgent Intervention team please call 312-996-7000 and ask for the Psychiatry Resident on Call. The Urgent Intervention Team can also facilitate transfers to UIC’s Inpatient Adult Psychiatry unit from other hospitals

CRP services
Community Reintegration Program (CRP) is a time limited psychiatric rehabilitation program dedicated to providing the supports and services necessary for mental health consumers to achieve their optimal level of social and occupational functioning. CRP provides therapeutic, social, and recreational opportunities that promote the achievement of mental health and recovery-oriented goals. For more information please contact Adriana Magana at 312-996-9986.

Inpatient services (8 East Psychosis Treatment Program Inpatient Team)
As much as possible, our goal is to help people with psychosis live their lives in the community. We try to avoid hospitalization unless it is absolutely necessary, but when it is needed, we provide patients treatment on a specialty psychosis inpatient service. In the event of hospitalization, our immediate goals will be to quickly stabilize the crisis keeping everyone’s safety as a first priority. At the same time, our other goal is to do the best we can to reduce the likelihood of future hospitalizations. We try to choose medications that will help with the current crisis but also will help with the long-term recovery process. Whenever possible, we will consider recommendations from family members or outpatient mental health providers as to what treatment would be best for the person in crisis.