HIV/AIDS Prevention for Youth & Families

 




PSYCHOLOGY INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

IN HIV/AIDS AND DRUG USE PREVENTION FOR YOUTH, ADULTS, AND FAMILIES

 

 

Program Summary: The Healthy Youths Program (HYP) is involved in basic and applied research on HIV/AIDS risk and prevention for youth and families. Populations of particular focus include youth with psychiatric illness, juvenile offenders, African American women and girls, and youth in international settings experiencing a high HIV prevalence. 

 

CURRENT ONGOING DATA COLLECTION AND STUDY IMPLEMENTATION

 

PHAT LIFE

Supervisors: Geri Donenberg, Ph.D., Erin McCarville, MPH

This is a 2-arm randomized controlled trial testing PHAT Life, an HIV and alcohol/drug use prevention program, for urban 12 – 17 year-old male and female juvenile offenders. Youth are recruited from juvenile probation settings and participate in an 8-session program (either PHAT Life or a health promotion intervention) over two weeks. Teens complete a baseline, 6- and 12-month interview, and they are tested for biological STIs at baseline and 12-month follow up. Treatment is provided for all participants who test positive. Opportunities for psychology interns: (1) facilitate the manualized intervention with female juvenile offenders, (2) work with the Department of Probation, and (3) conduct assessments.

 

IMARA

Supervisor: Geri Donenberg, Ph.D., Erin Emerson

This 2-arm randomized controlled trial tests an HIV prevention program for women and their African American daughters in psychiatric care. Families are recruited from multiple outpatient mental health clinics in Chicago. Mothers and daughters participate in a two-day workshop, randomized to either IMARA or FUEL. IMARA targets sexual behavior, emotion regulation, substance use, healthy relationships, HIV risk, mother-daughter communication and mother-daughter relationships. FUEL is a health promotion program for mothers and daughters that targets nutrition, exercise, violence prevention, and substance use. Mothers and daughters complete baseline, 6-, and 12-month interviews to evaluate treatment outcomes and they are tested for biological STIs at baseline and 12-months. Treatment is provided for all participants who test positive. Opportunities for psychology interns: (1) facilitate IMARA or FUEL, (2) conduct assessments, and (3) learn about randomized controlled trials.

 

COIP

Supervisors: Geri Donenberg, Ph.D., Dave Jimenez, Ph.D.

The Community Outreach Intervention Projects (COIP), founded in 1986, addresses HIV/AIDS among substance users operating from storefront sites in Austin, Humboldt Park, West Englewood, South Chicago, and Uptown, and its mobile units which extend services into other neighborhoods including inner-ring suburbs. COIP's interventions are known for their use of the Indigenous Leader Outreach Model, which employs former drug users to deliver services and assist in conducting research. COIP’s services include street outreach, diabetes and blood pressure screening, HCV screening, counseling and testing for HIV/AIDS, syphilis and other infectious diseases associated with substance use, case management for persons living with or at high risk for HIV infection, syringe exchange, drug abuse and risk reduction counseling, support groups, educational activities, and projects that enhance linkages to care for HIV-positive men and women exiting jail. COIP also conducts research to better understand and prevent HIV/AIDS in Chicago communities. Opportunities for psychology interns include 1) community-based mental health service provision, (2) substance use treatment provision, (3) mental health services for HIV infected adults, and (4) street outreach for HIV prevention. 

 

GIRLTALK: We Talk

Supervisors: Helen Wilson, Ph.D., Brenikki Floyd, Ph.D.

This study builds upon and expands a longitudinal study with a sample of low-income, urban AA girls in Chicago to explicate ways in which early violence exposure is repeated in romantic relationships and increases risk of unsafe sexual behavior. The specific aims of this project are to: (1) Prospectively examine the pathway from violence exposure to dating violence and unsafe sexual behavior; (2) Longitudinally examine relationships between dating violence, unsafe sexual behavior, and STIs; (3) Examine romantic relationship characteristics that may explain the pathway from violence exposure to dating violence and unsafe sexual behavior; (4) Examine physiological and psychological mechanisms that may explain the pathway from violence exposure to dating violence and unsafe sexual behavior. Participants who completed a 2-year longitudinal study focused on HIV risk behavior, beginning at ages 12-16, (N=265; G. Donenberg, PI) and a subsequent comprehensive assessment of lifetime trauma and victimization history in 2009-2010 (H. Wilson, PI) will be invited to participate in a new wave of data collection to understand dating relationships in late adolescence (ages 18-22). Opportunities for psychology interns include (1) conduct assessments, and (2) learn state-of-the-art approaches to collecting saliva samples.

 

SECONDARY DATA ANALYSIS AND MANUSCRIPT PREPARATION OPPORTUNITIES

 

GIRLTALK

Supervisor: Geri Donenberg, Ph.D., Erin Emerson, MA

GIRL TALK tests a framework of HIV-risk that emphasizes the interplay of family, peer and partner mechanisms and proposes that family processes (mother-daughter relationships and communication, maternal attitudes and beliefs, mothers’ risk behavior and partner relationships) influence sexual risk behaviors directly and indirectly through peer and partner relationships among AA 12-18 year old girls seeking psychiatric care. Mothers and daughters (N=266) were recruited from seven urban mental health clinics in Chicago and followed for 2 years (baseline, 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-months). Participants complete questionnaires, participate in interviews, and engaged in three structured videotaped interaction tasks. Data collection and entry are complete. Opportunities for psychology interns include secondary data analysis and manuscript preparation.

 

Project BALANCE

Supervisor: Geri Donenberg, Ph.D., Erin Emerson, MA

Project Balance was a 3-arm randomized controlled trial for adolescents in therapeutic day schools. Participants (N=418) were adolescents with psychiatric disorders in Rhode Island and Chicago. Project Balance evaluated an affect management and a skills-based intervention and compared the efficacy of these treatment conditions to a general health promotion control group. The Affect Management intervention included non-cognitive factors to target distress in sexual situations. Each intervention involved 12 45-minute sessions delivered in a classroom setting and co-facilitated by trained research assistants. The intervention used role-plays, games, videos, discussions, and specially tailored experiential activities to delay sexual debut and reduce risky sexual behavior. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 3-, 6-, and 12-months post intervention. A booster session was implemented one month after the 12th session. Data collection and entry are complete. Opportunities for psychology intern include secondary data analysis and manuscript preparation.

 

CARES

Supervisor: Geri Donenberg, Ph.D.

CARES explores HIV/AIDS risk determinants among 325 ethnically diverse teenagers seeking outpatient mental health services. Study aims were to (a) determine rates of risky sexual behavior and drug use among youth in psychiatric care and compare these rates to rates among teens in the general population; (b) test and compare the utility of two theoretical models in explaining HIV-risk -- the Information-Motivation-Behavior model (Fisher & Fisher, 1992) and a social-personal model (Donenberg & Pao, 2003); and (c) test and compare the two models for theoretically important subgroups of youth (internalizing, externalizing, substance abusing). Teens and parents were recruited from four outpatient mental health clinics and interviewed at baseline, 6- and 12-months. Family members completed a combination of interviews and questionnaires to assess HIV/AIDS information, motivation, and behavioral skills, and teens' personal attributes, relationship concerns, and risky sexual behavior and substance use. Parents and teens also participated in two structured videotaped interaction tasks. Opportunities for psychology interns include secondary data analyses and manuscript preparation. 

 

OTHER ONGOING DATA COLLECTION AND STUDY IMPLEMENTATION

 

SOUTH AFRICA STYLE

Supervisors: Geri Donenberg, Ph.D., Erin Emerson, M.A.

This developmental study is adapting and pilot testing an HIV and alcohol/drug use prevention program for South African caregivers and their teens receiving outpatient mental health services. Stage 1 included extensive formative work (e.g., focus groups, feedback groups, in-depth interviews, theater testing) followed by curricular revisions. In Stage 2, we will pilot test the revised intervention with two groups of 14 – 18 year old parent-teen dyads receiving mental health services. Teens will be male and female from all ethnic groups. In Stage 3, we will test the revised program with 90 parent-teen dyads randomly assigned to SASTYLE versus a control group and re-interview families at 3 and 9 months.

 

IMPROVING ADHERENCE FOR HIV+ RWANDAN YOUTH

Supervisors: Geri Donenberg, Ph.D.

This project will implement a 2-arm RCT to test and compare the efficacy of adherence-enhanced TI-CBT (i.e., TI-CBTe) to usual care in increasing ART adherence among 350 Rwandan 14 – 21 year olds from the two clinics caring for the largest number of youth with HIV in Rwanda. Based on the Indigenous Leader Outreach Model, we will train 20 HIV+ indigenous youth leaders who are > 95% ART adherent (IYL) and supervising psychologists to deliver the intervention. Youth, caregivers, and IYL will complete baseline, 6-, and 12-month follow-up assessments to assess effects on adherence and important mediators (trauma, depression, gender-based violence).

 

HIV PREVENTION FOR INDONESIAN STREET YOUTH

Supervisors: Geri Donenberg, Ph.D.

The goal of this exploratory study is to develop and pilot test an innovative, age and gender appropriate, and culturally sensitive intervention, based upon an integrated adaptation of the Street Smart Program, Outreach Case Management, and peer education strategies, to reduce HIV transmission related to risky sex, drug use, and mental health problems among urban youth living on the streets of Jakarta.