Pediatric Intervention Research in Affect Regulation and Mood Disorders (PIRAMD)

DIRECTOR
Amy E. West, PhD

TEAM MEMBERS
Sally M. Weinstein, PhD
Jacquelyn Doxie, MA
Amy Peters, BA
Psychology trainees

The PIRAMD lab’s mission is to develop and test psychosocial treatments for children suffering from pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD). The primary goal of these interventions is to address the psychosocial and interpersonal impairments that are often associated with symptoms of bipolar disorder in pediatric populations. We have two ongoing research projects:

RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL OF CHILD-AND FAMILY-FOCUSED COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY
Principal Investigator: Amy E. West, PhD

Supported by funding from the National Institutes of Mental Health, we are investigating a child-and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (CFF-CBT, also called RAINBOW therapy) program for children with bipolar disorder and their parents. This program integrates psychoeducation, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and interpersonal therapy and mindfulness techniques to address the psychosocial and interpersonal aspects of PBD. CFF-CBT is a 12-session psychotherapy intervention designed to be used adjunctive to pharmacotherapy. Preliminary research results suggest that participating in the intervention resulted in significantly reduced symptoms of PBD and better social and academic functioning. We are currently recruiting children 7-13 with a bipolar spectrum disorder and their families for participation in this study.

Funding: NIMH 1 K23 MH 79935-01A2

IDENTIFYING RISK FACTORS AND INTERVENTION METHODS TO PREVENT SUICIDE IN PEDIATRIC BIPOLAR DISORDER
Principal Investigator: Sally Weinstein, PhD

Supported by funding from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, this study seeks to advance understanding of suicide risk and treatment in pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) to guide the development of a targeted suicide prevention intervention for these youth. To accomplish this objective, the study aims to identify the family, child cognitive, and affective risk factors associated with suicidal ideation and/or behavior in PBD that may be targets for treatment. We will then explore how an evidence-based, manualized psychosocial therapy for PBD (Child- and Family-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy; CFF-CBT) may prevent or reduce suicidal events by improving these factors. Subsequently, findings will be used to develop a targeted suicidal event reduction (SURE) intervention module designed to optimize suicide prevention within this at-risk population.

FUNDING: NIMH 1 K23 MH 79935-01A2

About


The Brain Center and the clinic is a part of the Pediatric Mood Disorders Program, The Colbeth Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic, the Institute for Juvenile Research, and the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Contact


1747 West Roosevelt Road
Suite 155, M/C 747
Chicago, IL 60608
Phone: (312) 996-7723
Fax: (312) 413-0063

Support


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