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Since its early beginnings in the 1890s, our Department has an esteemed history of providing outstanding service

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History

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Before there was a UIC College of Medicine, there was the College of Physicians and Surgeons, known colloquially as

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Institutes

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Learn about the institutes of Department of Psychiatry

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Values Statement

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EXCELLENCE EVERYWHERE — in research, education and clinical work

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Postgraduate Year 4

In the fourth year it is expected that residents will refine their basic skills as well as acquire new knowledge in particular areas of interest of psychiatry. All residents are expected to continue outpatient psychotherapy and medication management clinics. There is significant time available for additional elective experiences based on resident preferences. Residents may elect to have an administrative experience on one of the inpatient units or outpatient clinics, provide community consultation, and/or conduct research.

About 50 percent of a fourth-year resident’s time is devoted to an assigned clinical experience, such as serving as a junior attending on an inpatient unit or junior attending in one of the specialty clinics. The remaining 50 percent is devoted to elective activities which include clinical, teaching, and/or research options.

Alternatively, fourth-year residents may elect to enter one of the fellowships offered by the Department of Psychiatry at the PGY-4 level: Child and Adolescent, Women's Mental Health, or PRIME Residency (VA-based, where the resident is trained to consult with primary care teams in general medicine and to teach recognition of psychiatric disorders, addiction problems, and the management of minor psychiatric conditions). These fellowships have specific clinical research programs and allow the resident to develop an area of expertise before beginning a private, public, or academic career.

Elective rotations in the fourth year vary with resident preference and may include an in-depth clinical experience in any one of the department’s programs - Neurobehavioral, Psychotic Disorders, Women's Mental Health Services, Mood & Anxiety Disorders, or Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

GOALS

  • · Further development and consolidation of an identity as a psychiatrist through administrative assignments as chief resident or senior resident in a variety of clinical settings.
  • · Integration of clinical skills through participation in a variety of selective and elective rotations.
  • · Further development of intellectual curiosity through participation in ongoing research or development of new projects.

Grand Rounds Presentation. As part of the ACGME requirement for academic activity, our senior residents are required to present at the department grand rounds. They can select the topic and form of the presentation. Clinically-based residents often opt for the presentation of a clinical case or series of cases that served as the basis for educational development. For those residents who conducted research or completed a specific research project, they will often present the process and results.

 

Postgraduate Year 3

 

As residents complete their PG-2 year, they have the opportunity to select the focus for their PG 3 year.  The majority of residents are clinically focused and have the opportunity to choose between a community-based or a multi-specialty based component of their curriculum. These “tracks” are not subspecialty oriented; rather, they reflect different approaches to general psychiatric training and mental health care delivery. Each track has a different emphasis, but our aim is that each track prepares residents to be good general psychiatrists. Continuity of care for the patient is the core principle in designing these tracks. Rather than assignments to inpatient or outpatient settings, the resident will follow the same patient wherever the patient goes. Both tracks at the various sites will provide requisite knowledge and skills for continued development as a psychiatric clinician. All PGY-3 residents attend the same didactics regardless of the track chosen.

In addition to the two clinical tracks, a research program, the Biomedical Neuroscience Training Program, is available for those trainees interested in developing skills in the areas of basic science and clinical research. Under the direction of eminent researchers, trainees are educated in the principles of research design, epidemiology, methodology, and outcome evaluation as related to basic neuroscience research and psychopharmacology.

Clinical work during the PG 3 year occurs primarily in an outpatient setting. Depending on the educational track chosen, residents gain experience from seeing patients in our multispecialty clinics, community rotation sites, medication management clinics, and psychotherapy. Supervision is provided by senior clinicians in all areas.

GOALS

  • · The facilitation of confidence in one's capacity as a psychiatric clinician capable of providing continuity of care across a spectrum of clinical services, using alternative management techniques for inpatient hospitalization, and becoming familiar with the managerial role of the psychiatrist on an interdisciplinary team.
  • · The acquisition of the requisite skills to perform the various psychotherapies (individual, insight-oriented, group, family, and cognitive behavioral), manage chronically ill patients in an outpatient setting, and implement psychosocial treatments in community settings.

Journal Club. The PG3 class is charged with running the journal club. Once a month, the residents review a specific scientific paper using evidence based principals and consult with an expert faculty member for discussion. Dr. Michael Schrift is the faculty mentor for journal club.

Postgraduate Year 2

In the second year, residents spend the majority of their clinical time on inpatient unit sand begin to learn inpatient treatment of adults, children, and adolescents. Residents have varied experiences in the several inpatient settings.

Four assignments are at UIC hospital with adults: the Mood/Anxiety service, the Women’s Mental Health service, the Psychotic Disorders service, and Neuropsychiatry service. There is also an assignment on the Department of Child and Family Services (DCFS) Child and Adolescent unit. The other assignments are the Jesse Brown VA Hospital, MacNeal Hospital (community-based), and Madden Mental Health Center (state hospital). Each unit has a different patient population and length of stay. Residents receive direct supervision on all units.

Residents also begin their outpatient psychotherapy experience by seeing 2-3 patients a week in the clinic. Residents have weekly supervision of these cases with experienced psychotherapists.

GOALS

· The acquisition of knowledge and proficiency in the diagnosis and treatment of seriously disturbed patients in the inpatient setting.

· The formation of an identity as a psychiatrist by developing sensitivity and empathy, and tolerance of different opinions and attitudes about mental illness and treatment. This is accomplished by relating to other mental health professionals, appreciating social and cultural factors that influence behavior, and gaining an appreciation of one's strengths and limitations.

· The understanding of psychodynamic principles and the goals of psychodynamic psychotherapy in both the inpatient and outpatient settings.

· The acquisition of knowledge and skills in the use of various biological treatments, including ECT.

· Development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that begin to establish the core knowledge base for the diagnosis, treatment, and case management of psychiatric disorders. The resident spends four months on the psychiatric inpatient services at UIC Hospital and at Jesse Brown VA Hospital.

· Development of skills appropriate to the practice of consultation-liaison psychiatry. Residents rotate through a one month consultation-liaison services at both UIC Hospital and Jesse Brown VA Hospital.

Morning Report. Residents on the Emergency Service and Inpatient Service attend morning report Monday through Friday from 8:00 to 9:00 a.m. Faculty and PGY-4 residents involved in the Emergency Room and Intake Services conduct this report.  The time is divided between review of clinical information and didactic presentations. Residents summarize their emergency room activities at this time. Emphasis is placed on case presentation and formulation, differential diagnosis, case management, and disposition issues.  The didactic component consisted of planned lectures and case-based learning.

 

Postgraduate Year 1

Our PG-1 year is based on a 13 block schedule, each 4 weeks long. Interns spend 6 block/months on medicine and neurology and 7 block/months in psychiatry.

Goals

· Synthesis of an identity as a competent and empathic physician during a four-month rotation on medicine or pediatrics at the UIC Hospital or the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center Hospital. The rotation is usually divided into two to three months on the general medicine or pediatric unit and one to two months on the ambulatory service.

· Development of knowledge and enhancement of skills in the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders. The resident spends a total of two months on inpatient neurology.

· Development of knowledge and skills of psychiatric assessment, triage, and immediate intervention and treatment during the two months in the psychiatric admitting clinics and emergency rooms at the UIC Hospital and Jesse Brown VA Hospital. Emphasis is on learning how to interview effectively, conduct a mental status examination, and complete a detailed psychiatric history.

· Acquiring knowledge and understanding of community agencies and resources, such as the state hospital system, community mental health clinics, detoxification centers, half-way houses, and nursing homes.

· Development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that begin to establish the core knowledge base for the diagnosis, treatment, and case management of psychiatric disorders. The resident spends four months on the psychiatric inpatient services at UIC Hospital and at Jesse Brown VA Hospital.

Teaching Call. The new resident is paired with a more advanced resident for the first four times being on-call in psychiatry. This helps the new resident gain confidence in his or her ability to clinically assess psychopathology and make dispositions. After this month, residents have access to the back-up resident and to the attending on-call for clinical consultation.

Morning Report. Residents on the Emergency Service and Inpatient Service attend morning report Monday through Friday from 8:00 to 9:00 a.m. Faculty and PGY-4 residents involved in the Emergency Room and Intake Services conduct this report.  The time is divided between review of clinical information and didactic presentations. Residents summarize their emergency room activities at this time. Emphasis is placed on case presentation and formulation, differential diagnosis, case management, and disposition issues.  The didactic component consisted of planned lectures and case-based learning.

 

Curriculum Overview

New for 2013

Based on an initial Education Program Assessment by Dr. Henry Dove, our Associate Head for Education, a Curriculum Review Committee was formed comprised of residents and faculty. The Committee has been hard at work, starting with the didactic curriculum. We have completed the revision to the PGY1 and most of the PGY2 seminars. The Committee will continue to move forward with curriculium revewi and revision process over the next year. This will assist us in planning for the ACGME NAS Milestones which will be implemented in July 2014.

Educational Goals and Philosophy

The mission of the UIC Psychiatry Residency Training Program is to provide high-quality education and training. Our program aims to train psychiatrists who will become astute diagnosticians with a comprehensive understanding of human behavior from a variety of perspectives. Additionally, residents leave with the skills and competence to provide quality psychiatric care using appropriate modalities.

Our training program is based on the principle that all residents should have broadly ranged clinical rotations, opportunities to function in a variety of clinical settings, formal experiences in a wide range of subspecialty areas, and opportunities to pursue postgraduate fellowships and research career development. We also educate our residents in the current trends in psychiatry, particularly with regard to social and community psychiatry, neuropsychiatry, psychotic disorders, women’s mental health, and mood and anxiety disorders.

Trainees are encouraged to be curious, to question and synthesize information, and to take on more responsibility and function with an increasing degree of independence. The underlying assumption of the training program is that four years of training in a general psychiatry program can provide a baseline breadth and depth of education and skills. The education of a psychiatrist only begins during the training years and continues beyond the residency.

Learning is a life-long process. Education and training can occur only on the fertile ground of clinical excellence and in an atmosphere where advancement of knowledge is encouraged. Partnerships and collegiality between faculty and residents promote an environment where education flourishes. Our faculty members encourage individual initiative and motivation, and the program is designed to meet the general as well as specific needs and interests of individual residents.

The four-year curriculum is designed to emphasize the resident's responsibility for psychopharmacological treatment, psychotherapy, and case management. Clinical experiences foster increasing responsibility and autonomy as training progresses. Whether care occurs in the emergency room, inpatient unit, or outpatient setting, the training program offers a clinical sequence with broad-based clinical opportunities and experiences. Dedicated faculty members provide supervision of all clinical activities.

As we prepare our residents for a future that emphasizes developments in the neurosciences, we continue our emphasis on the in-depth understanding of the psychotherapies.

Please see the links to the left that cover the specific year curriculum and seminars.

 

Additional Features of the Program

Call. Currently the overnight and weekends at the UIC Medical Center and Jesse Brown VA are covered by a combination of a nightfloat, short call, and weekend call shifts. The nightfloat rotation runs Sun-Thur, 8pm-8am. Residents are not scheduled for daytime clinical rotations during nightfloat. Short call is Mon-Thur, 4:30pm-8pm. Weekends are covered by a series of call shifts. Friday call is 4:30pm-8am. Saturday is covered by two shifts, 8am-8pm and 8pm-8am. Sunday is covered by one shift, 8am-8pm.

Supervision. Residents have on-site faculty supervision for each clinical assignment throughout the four years. In addition, each PGY-2 resident is assigned an outpatient supervisor for his/her ongoing psychotherapy cases. PGY-3 and 4 residents are assigned individual supervisors for dynamic therapy, cognitive/behavioral psychotherapy and outpatient child & adolescent cases.

Residency Education and Training Committee Meeting. The residency training director holds a one-hour meeting twice a month that is open to faculty and residents for the purpose of reviewing curriculum, policies, clinical sites, and seminars.

Clinical Case Conference.This weekly conference at the University Inpatient Unit is attending by residents rotating on inpatient psychiatry, emergency psychiatry and consult-liaison. Residents rotate presenting a recent patient with faculty discussion and review of relevant literature.

Chief Resident's Meeting. The two Chief Residents meet weekly with all the residents to discuss ongoing projects, review current concerns and to convey information. They also serve as the resident liaison to the faculty.

Journal Club. Once a month, residents review a specific scientific paper using evidence based principals and consult with an expert faculty member for discussion. In addition there are journal clubs sponsored by clinical sections within the Department of Psychiatry.

Grand Rounds/Residency Forum. Wednesday afternoon is devoted to educational meetings, case conferences, forums, and grand rounds. The series includes outside speakers, faculty speakers, and clinically oriented sessions organized by residents and service chiefs.

Medical Student Teaching. All residents participate in teaching medical students on each clinical rotation. A course on teaching skills is provided. Residents may also elect to give selected lectures in medical student courses or to teach a small group of first-year and/or second-year medical students as part of the Essentials of Clinical Medicine course.

Research. We encourage residents to do research. Residents who are interested in a specific research project should identify faculty with similar interests. Residents with prior research experience are encouraged to begin linking to faculty members early in their residency. Although clinical research can be conducted at any time during residency training, specific time can be allocated in the fourth year. Our department has been successful in stimulating the research interests of our residents. Easy access to faculty who can serve as mentors has facilitated this process.

Please see the link at "Research" in the left-hand menu for more information

Retreats. Retreats for residents only and for residents and faculty together serve to promote professional development and provide a forum for discussion of resident issues across a broad spectrum of topics. PGY-1 residents also enjoy a team-building wilderness retreat during orientation.

Departmental Libraries. The department has several libraries. The Jack Weinberg library at the Psychiatric Institute maintains a wide range of psychiatric journals and books, over 400 videotape titles, has a librarian and four computers for Medline searchers. The Edward E. Byars library is located at the Neuropsychiatric Institute, where the residents have their offices. It has a collection of the most-used psychiatric reference books and texts for the residents’ immediate reference.

Directions

Address:

  1. Ambulatory Clinic:
    Neuropsychiatric Insitute
    912 S. Wood Steet, Chicago, IL 60612
  2. UIC Hospital
    1740 W Taylor St, Chicago, IL 60612
  3. Institute for Juvenile Research
    1747 W. Roosevelt Rd, Chicago, IL 60608
  4. Psychiatric Institute
    1601 W. Taylor St.Chicago, IL 60612

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